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Dial 911 for life threatening emergency

Bayonne Medical Center

29 East 29th Street
Bayonne NJ 07002 
Phone: 201.858.5257
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Christ Hospital

176 Palisade Avenue
Jersey City NJ 07306 
Phone: 201.795.8280
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Hoboken UMC

308 Willow Avenue
Hoboken NJ 07030 
Phone: 201.418.1900 
Directions

 

Please select the urgent care location closest to you, check-in online and then wait at home until it is your turn to be seen.

Dr. Frank Diaz and Dr. Jolanta Potoczek-Salahi
391 John F. Kennedy • Bayonne, NJ
CarePoint Health Immediate Care - Bayonne Family Practice
(201) 858-4110
Directions

Dr. Sapan Majmundar
113 14th Street • Hoboken, NJ
CarePoint Health Immediate Care - Hoboken
(201) 683-9990
Directions

Dr. Joven Dungo
205 9th St • Jersey City, NJ
CarePoint Health Immediate Care - Newport
(201) 653-1144
Directions

Dr. Mohammad H. Miqbel
7511 Bergenline Ave • North Bergen, NJ
CarePoint Health Immediate Care - North Bergen
(201) 863-8032
Directions

Dr. Edward Boylan
550 Newark Ave • Jersey City, NJ
CarePoint Health Immediate Care - Midtown
(201) 656-2300
Directions

Dr. Alejandro Presilla
322 49th St • Union City, NJ
CarePoint Health Immediate Care - Union City
(201) 863-8667
Directions

CarePoint Center for Gastrointestinal Services

Dial 911 for life threatening emergency

Bayonne Medical Center

29 East 29th Street
Bayonne NJ 07002 
Phone: 201.858.5257
Directions

Christ Hospital

176 Palisade Avenue
Jersey City NJ 07306 
Phone: 201.795.8280
Directions

Hoboken UMC

308 Willow Avenue
Hoboken NJ 07030 
Phone: 201.418.1900 
Directions

 

Comprehensive gastroenterological care
Cutting edge technology, procedures, and practices

Celiac Disease

Celiac disease is a disease that damages the small intestine because of a sensitivity to gluten, which is found in wheat, rye, barley and oats. This disorder interferes with the absorption of nutrients from food and is caused when tiny fingerlike protrusions, called villi (which line the small intestine and enable the absorption of nutrients from food into the bloodstream) are lost.

Celiac disease is a genetic disease that is often underdiagnosed. A person can have the disease without knowing, until it is triggered by situations like severe stress, pregnancy, surgery, physical injury, infection or childbirth.

Celiac disease affects people in different ways but symptoms often include chronic diarrhea or constipation, weight loss, recurring abdominal pain, bloating and gas, ale, foul-smelling stool, unexplained anemia, muscle cramps and/or bone pain and missed menstrual periods. Often people with celiac disease are asymptomatic because the undamaged part of the small intestine is still able to absorb enough nutrients however, these people are still at risk for complications of the disease.

Since symptoms of celiac disease are similar to those of other digestive diseases, it can be difficult to diagnose. Diagnostic procedures for celiac disease may include blood work or biopsy of the small intestine. For most people, eliminating gluten from their diet will stop symptoms, heal intestinal damage that has already occurred and prevent further damage. Usually, a person will see an improvement in symptoms within days of starting the diet and, within three to six months, the small intestine is usually completely healed, with villi intact and working. For older people, complete healing may take up to two years.